Manning’s Legacy is a just another frame for randomness

Peyton Manning’s Legacy
www.footballperspective.com

When Tom Brady leads the greatest scoring offense in NFL history to 14 points against a defense that allowed 22 points per game during the regular season, it does not become part of his narrative. When Joe Montana leads the 49ers to just three points in back-to-back playoff losses to the Giants, those games are pushed to the footnotes section of his biography…

The Montana over Manning argument is simple: Montana is better because he went 4-0 in Super Bowls, while Manning is 1-2. Such hard-hitting analysis ignores the fact that in each of the four seasons Montana won the Super Bowl, the 49ers defense ranked in the top three in either yards allowed, points allowed, or both. For Manning, “only one Super Bowl” is a scarlet letter. The common argument goes, “How could the greatest quarterback ever only win one Super Bowl?” That’s a fair question to ask, but we know the answer: the playoffs are a single elimination tournament where random events happen.

Anyone who has been with IAOFM for at least a year knows we rarely put a lot of stock in small samples. Unfortunately, that's what the playoffs are. Chug down a few bottles of historical bias, and soon you're drunk with the idea that Peyton Manning's legacy is suddenly tarnished by last week's performance.

I’m glad we had this talk.  Now, vaya con Dios, Brah.

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