Doc's Musings

How do you quicky replace 35-50 players? Part II

Note: This is the second of a two-part article, the first of which appeared yesterday.

Roulette Wheel II, the Sequel: Waivers
You can also find players like the new stealth offensive lineman (no one seems to have heard of him), Chris Clark, in the waivers system. According to the Broncos’ website:

Clark is a first-year player who spent the 2008 and 2009 seasons on Minnesota’s practice squad after competing in training camp with Tampa Bay in 2008… Earned All-Conference USA recognition as a senior at Southern Mississippi… Awarded to the Broncos via wavers from the Vikings on Sept. 5, 2010.

Waivers can hurt or help you - Denver lost safety Josh Barrett earlier this year, although they expected him to clear waivers and reach IR before stepping back in on STs next season and perhaps to develop his skill at covering tight ends. Bill Belichick managed to slide in his vote, and Barrett was a Patriot. Denver almost immediately picked up Kevin Vickerson - if you don’t have that big safety (although Bruton may make that jump), you’d better get a good rush on the QB.

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How do you quicky replace 35-50 players? Part I

Note: This is the first of a two-part article, the second of which will appear tomorrow at 3PM ET

I was watching some film the other day - a habit that I’ve gotten into. I find that I can retain the issues or points that I will want to write about as long as I keep the watching part to about one quarter of the game. I tend to watch each play until I know what each player on the screen is doing on that play - it can take one viewing or several, but I don’t move on until I’ve got that one clear in my mind.  By halftime I’m cranking out notes to keep up. If I don’t take a break by the middle of the third quarter, I’m starting to miss things that I knew about earlier. It’s a simple problem with a simple solution - you do a quarter, write it up, do another, take a break or two, and eventually you’ve got a game. First, you need to find certain patterns, characters, specific plays that illustrate concepts which affect the outcome of the drive, half or game - or find a couple of personalities that might make it into a good Broncography. Once in a great while, you find something that brings all of them together. If you can keep it to 5,000 words or so, you might even get by with it as an article. That’s where this came in. Since I’m always looking for things that might help out or even become the subject of a single article, what I saw recently became more and more concerning as I watched players dealing with injuries, under pressure to improve a weakness that affects the outcome of a game. The starting point was simple, but what it revealed was a major concern.

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The day after the Jets - 10 points to consider

After reading TJ’s synopsis of the Broncos/Jets contest, there isn’t that much that I have to offer that he hasn’t already commented on. There is also little to argue, since I find that most all he has to say can be effectively backed up by the play-by-play and by watching the contest again. That said, I’d like to offer a few thoughts that either didn’t come out or deserve to be given even greater support. Here are ten thoughts that I found worth considering after re-watching the game.
By the way, how many of you recall saying that what you really wanted this year, especially with all the injuries, was a team that went out and was competitive each week? Well, this one was a great example of watching what you wish for, because competitive was the name of this game. The outcome wasn’t what we wanted, but Denver was in it to the end. I was and am proud of this team, and I have a lot of faith in them, especially considering where they are coming from.

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Caught between Baltimore and New York

No one needs to ask if it was a tough Sunday for Broncos fans. Getting pounded that way after finding a way to beat Tennessee on the road, with rushing numbers that were violations of the obscenity laws is a hard row for any fan to hoe. Even so, there are things that you can find a way to see improvement in, and there are some things that you can’t help but recognize as better than you probably feel right now. Feeling better? Even with all the hurt from this game, if that’s hard to swallow, take a moment and consider these...

The Broncos entered the game in the top half of the league in rushing defense through four games, while not allowing any rusher to top the 100-yard mark. In a matchup of squads that pride themselves on being physical, those stats didn’t hold up.

No, those stats didn’t hold up at all. In fact, Denver gave up 233 rushing yards and 4 rushing TDs. Ray Rice had 133 of them himself with a 4.9 ypa. How do you get to feeling okay about that?

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Baltimore/Denver game Musings

There’s nothing quite like getting your hat handed to you, is there? When you get an old-fashioned whipping, you take it and move onward. There’s a good point in working out what went wrong - there’s no point in taking it too far. This was one of the top teams in the league, fresh off whipping the Steelers in Pittsburgh. They look and play like one of the best, and right now, they are. Denver? Not yet. Surprised? You shouldn’t be.
I mentioned this week that of the 53 players on the active roster of Denver in 2008, 32 of them couldn’t even get jobs in the league, playing ball. That means that you’re realistically looking at between 40 and 50 new players, and not all of them are going to be with the team in three more years, either. Some of them are band-aids - I see Jamal Williams that way, and it bothers me that we didn’t fill in a young NT, but that’s the way the draft goes. Or, is it?

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Sunday morning thoughts

Who’s in Charge Here, Anyway?

I wanted to put up a brief blurb of thanks to Titans DC Chuck Cecil for sharing the digitus impudecus with the refs and the crowd - including the kids both there at the game and on TV. Note to Coach Cecil - All the families with children want to thank you for sharing that teaching moment. I understand that it’s a loss of control during a very high stress situation, but you know where you play and about those big things called cameras. I think that the $40,000 was just about right. You earned every penny of that fine. It’s pretty hard to come down on players for acting out on the field when your coordinators are making obscene gestures on the sidelines. When you show that you don’t have any control, you do a pretty good job of suggesting that your players take the cheap shots when they do, just as they were accused of. Things like that start - and can stop - at the top.

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Preparing for Baltimore

In 2009, the Baltimore Ravens welcomed Denver to their fair city and beat the living bejabbers out of them. Denver was coming off their bye week, and they had taken the time to rest. Some fans thought that this showed a lack of discipline on the part of the coaches and players. What those fans didn’t know was that it really indicated a lack of depth on the team - the starters were simply worn out, and this wasn’t a team that had enough talent to let the rotational players spend too much time on the field. The final outcome - losing 8 of their last 10 games - started that fine autumn afternoon, and it rarely got any better. But, what’s changed since then?

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Forget the Titans

Never mind the cheap shots, the wasting of their own efforts and how well the Broncos handled them. Forget the Titans. What do you say about Kyle Orton?

You’d probably have to start with the fact that very little fazes him. Not the 6 sacks that the Titans laid on him. Not the late hit below the waist. Not the outright hatred that a lot of misguided fans laid on him in the past year. Probably not even the number of late arrivals that are looking for a bandwagon to jump on. Mostly, Kyle Orton doesn’t care. He just does his job, drives his Prius and works with conservation groups. This is NOT normal star QB behavior. But then again, Orton has never been the big star QB.

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Broncos beat Titans

It’s happened to all of us. It looks like your team is playing like processed dung. You pop into the kitchen for a brewski and find the remains of last night’s chicken sitting next to it. The BBQ sauce you made for the last set of ribs still looks kind of good, smells fine, and pretty soon, you’re well into food prep. You walk back to the living room and suddenly the Hottentot Hasbeens have gained 10 points on the scoreboard. Ah, well, they’re still down 10 more. You’ll catch the highlights on whatever sports show is in your area.

The game drags on - looks like both teams fought out their energy in the first half, but the Hasbeens are at least trying. Suddenly, it looks like the Davenport Dilberts have been caught in press when their safeties are in Cover 2 - you just don’t do that. Your QB audibles, drops into the shotgun, drops back, loads up - and through the window comes a piercing scream from the area of the swing set. This isn’t your first game - it’s not your first kid, either, that that was the “I fell and sprained something scream (Note - it’s not your first kid-scream, either)”. You fly out the back door, with the ball still in the air. Worse still, it turns out that it’s probably just a minor sprain, but it’s a a full-bore bickering argument between the kids. By the time you straighten that out and clarify that pulling on people’s pants when they are hanging from the monkey bars really is unacceptable behavior, regardless of what a visiting male child he thinks that his uncle told him (make a note to talk to that perverted idiot) and get an ice bag on the knee, you suddenly recall that there’s a game on. Or was. Could be?

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The days gone by and yet to come

This year, the Broncos found themselves in an odd and difficult situation: they were unable to retain Brandon Stokley’s services. They found themselves with that most rare of cases by having not merely a sufficiency of talent at the wide receiver position, but an excess of riches. While cocaine may be God’s way of telling you that you’re making too much money, having to let go a player who was your best bet on third downs the year before - an area where Denver only managed to convert about 1/3 of their opportunities - is a far more mundane way of telling you two facts. The first is this - sooner or later, every player will fight the opponent who has yet to lose - Time. There was, of course, a second reason.

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